Range Rover park brake fault system is not functional (& how to fix it)

Every Range Rover owner dreads a problem with the park brake system since it affects the vehicle’s safety.

In this article, I will share my insights and knowledge about this issue, including the signs and symptoms, possible OBD codes, common causes, and — most importantly — what you can do to try and fix it.

What models are affected?

Signs and symptoms

When the park brake fault system is not functional, an alert appears on your message center.

The warning message usually says, “Park Brake Fault System Not Functional.” Apart from this message, you may also experience some other signs and symptoms, such as:

  • The parking brake warning light illuminates even when not in use
  • The electric parking brake system fails to apply or release
  • You may hear a grinding noise coming from the back wheels
  • The parking brake may become stuck or blocked
  • The vehicle may start to roll away when parked on a slope

These signs and symptoms indicate a problem with the park brake fault system.

List of possible OBD codes

The following is a list of possible OBD codes that may be relevant to the Range Rover park brake fault system not functional:

  • P1639– Traction Control System (TCS) – Signal Malfunction
  • U3000– Control Module – Internal Failure
  • C1A20– Brake Pressure Transducer Calibration Not Learned
  • C1A21– Brake Pressure Transducer Signal Failure
  • C1A24– Brake Pressure Transducer Range/Performance

Common Causes

There are various reasons why the park brake fault system may fail. The common causes include:

  • Failing Actuators: These are responsible for engaging the parking brake. If these actuators fail, the parking brake will not engage.
  • Faulty Cables: When the cables that connect the brake handle to the parking brake mechanism are damaged, the parking brake will not engage.
  • Electrical Problems: Failure of the electrical system responsible for activating the parking brake can cause it to fail. It can be due to a blown fuse in the system or a damaged electrical relay.
  • Faulty Control Module: The control module is responsible for sending signals to engage the parking brake. When it fails, it may not send the signal required to engage the parking brake.
  • Damaged Brake Pads: Faulty brake pads or rotors can cause the parking brakes not to engage.

Can it be fixed without a mechanic?

If you are an experienced DIY person, you may be able to fix the park brake fault system without a mechanic. Although it may require specific tools, parts, and expertise, it is still possible.

To determine the cause of the issue, you must diagnose the problem using an OBD scanner or follow the steps outlined below.

Parts you’ll need to fix it

To fix the park brake fault system not functional, you may need to purchase the following parts:

  • New Actuators
  • Replacement Cables
  • Electrical Relays
  • Control Module Assembly
  • New Brake Pads and Rotors (if deemed faulty)

Tools you’ll need to fix it

  • Socket set
  • Wrench set
  • Screwdriver set
  • Torque Wrench
  • OBD Scanner

How to fix it

  1. Diagnose the problem: Use an OBD scanner to read the fault codes generated by the electronic control module. If there are no fault codes, proceed to step 2. Otherwise, address the specific faults, as described by the OBD scanner.
  2. Remove the brake pads and replace them with new ones if necessary. The parking brake engages when the brake pads make contact with the rotor. Worn-out brake pads will cause the parking brake to fail.
  3. Check the cables connecting the brake handle. Replace them if they are damaged.
  4. Inspect the actuator assembly for any signs of wear and tear. Replace any damaged or worn-out actuators.
  5. Check the brake fluid levels. If the brake fluid is too low, it can cause the parking brake to fail.
  6. Check the electrical relays and fuses. Replace any that are blown or damaged.
  7. Inspect the control module assembly for signs of wear and tear. Replace any damaged or worn-out components.
  8. Once you have completed the above steps, test the parking brake to ensure it is engaging and disengaging correctly. If it still does not work, take your Range Rover to a mechanic.

Potential alternative causes

Other causes of parking brake failure include:

  • A malfunctioning ABS system
  • A Failed Hand Brake Assembly
  • Worn-out Rotor Disc

If the above steps do not fix the park brake fault system, consider performing more thorough diagnostics or taking your car to a skilled mechanic to help identify and resolve them.

FAQs

What causes the Range Rover park brake fault?

There are various reasons why the Range Rover park brake fault system may fail, including failing actuators, faulty cables, electrical problems, faulty control modules, and damaged brake pads or rotors.

Is driving a Range Rover with a malfunctioning park brake fault system safe?

It is not recommended to drive your Range Rover with the park brake fault system not functional. Doing so can be dangerous and may cause damage to your vehicle.

How much does it cost to fix the park brake fault system?

The cost of fixing the park brake fault system can vary depending on the cause of the issue, the location, and the shop rates. Replacing the cables may cost between $200 to $400, while changing the brake pads may cost between $150 to $300. Replacing other parts can cost more.

How often should you check the park brake system on a Range Rover?

You should check the park brake system each time you service your vehicle. If you encounter any issues or hear any unusual noises, investigate further and have the system fixed immediately.

Summary

It can be a significant problem when a Range Rover’s park brake fault system is malfunctioning. Take it seriously because it can affect the safety of your vehicle.

Its most common causes include failing actuators, faulty cables, electrical problems, damaged brake pads or rotors, and malfunctioning control modules.

Though you can fix the problem yourself with the right tools and knowledge, it is best to take your car to a skilled mechanic if you are not confident.

Last updated and verified on 4th September 2023

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